November 10, 2016: Diagnosis: Lisfranc injury

We saw the first orthopedist on November 10th and she was immediately suspicious that 20161110_094514Mia Rose had sustained a lisfranc injury. She ordered a weight bearing x-ray, meaning that Mia Rose had to stand on her injured foot while they took the x-ray (not fun). Ten minutes later the doctor showed us the x-ray you see here and explained that it indicated an unstable lisfranc injury with a 2 mm separation and that surgery was required.  She said that the lisfranc ligament was torn which was what allowed the bones to dislocate and that in order for the ligament to heal the bones had to be put back in perfect alignment and kept that way with screws. This was devastating news for Mia Rose who was getting ready to head into her competition season with the expectation of a great season.

We saw two additional orthopedic surgeons over the next few days to make sure that the diagnosis was correct and surgery was truly necessary. All three shared the same diagnosis and need for surgery with us. We opted to go with a surgeon who had the most experience with this injury and with treating gymnasts including Olympians and national team members.

The doctor we selected, explained that during the surgery he would remove any bone fragments that were in the area and insert anywhere from 1-5 screws as needed to stabilize all of the joints that were unstable from the injury. He said that during surgery he would be able to determine exactly which joints were injured so that everything could be put back in perfect alignment in order for the ligaments to heal. He explained that after surgery Mia Rose would need to be 100% non-weight bearing in a hard cast for at least 6 weeks and then immobilized in an orthopedic boot with progressive weight bearing for an additional 4-6 weeks. He also explained that after 3 months she would need to have a second surgery to remove the screws and that she would not be able to do any impact activities such as running or jumping until after the screws were removed because of the risk of the screws breaking from impact.

We scheduled the surgery for later that week so that she could get on the road to recovery as quickly as possible.

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